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  • ...introduces Morgause, presents "Igraine" (?), shows Arthur's short temper and thoughtlessness, lets Uther lose against Arthur for the first time, makes Gaius and Merlin forget about previous happenings and gives us nevertheless the best swordfight scene on the show.


    Please discuss here :-)

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    • oh god, this episode was AWESOME!  Arthur was particularly wonderful, Uther too!

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    • Yeah, beautiful scene but it was moving when arthur has embraced his mother for the first time..  

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    • If I am not mistaken, there is thisscene that shows Uther talked to Nimueh about Igraine's death after giving birth to Arthur and Uther blamed Nimueh. Is there any scene like that anywhere? Did I miss it from the episode or is it somewhere else?

      So, anyway, was Igraine real in here or just like Merlin said, she was just illusion Morgause made to fool Arthur?

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    • Edrea wrote:
      If I am not mistaken, there is thisscene that shows Uther talked to Nimueh about Igraine's death after giving birth to Arthur and Uther blamed Nimueh. Is there any scene like that anywhere? Did I miss it from the episode or is it somewhere else?

      So, anyway, was Igraine real in here or just like Merlin said, she was just illusion Morgause made to fool Arthur?

      Right now I don't have the time to give my full review but I'd like to answer your question best I can:

      to me, Igraine wasn't real due to several reasons I will explain later. However, at a convention somewhere, the producers (don't know who it was) said that Igraine was real.

      It doesn't actually makes much sense to me and we were often told things by the showrunners that turned out differently, so I honestly don't know. 

      And yes, Uther blamed Nimueh in season one. "The Sins of the Father" strongly contradicted what was said in season one and turned it into the opposite. More later :-)

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    • I actually (by pure chance) rewatched this episode last night. I was just in the mood to watch Merlin and I had some spare time so I put in the dvd. I had no idea it was the episode currently being disscussed.


      Anyway, I have a new theory regarding something in this episode I wanted to share.


      Is it possible that Morgana and Morgause are not really related? Because Uther assuming a baby Morgause died, Gaius smuggling her away to the high priestess, all seems like something that would come from Gorlois having a bastard; not Vivenne simply having a daughter before Morgana. Also, even though at this point Gaius does NOT know Morgana is uther's daughter, he still describes Morgause as Morgana's half-sister. If it were Vivenne and Gorlois' baby, she would have been her full sister (in Gauis' perception at this point) not half. It would also add fuel to Morgana's anger at finding out Uther is her father, and explain her insistance on being "The daughter of Gorlois" if in her mind Morgause was the only one she could trust; not really being her 'sister' would be earth-shattering to her, so I can see her wanting to kill Uther almost more for that than anything.

      However, I suppose it is also possible that Vivenne (Who we know cheated on her husband with Uther and so apparently had no qulams about having lovers when she was lonely) had Morgause out of wedlock and the baby had to be smuggled out. BUT if such was the case, Morgause would have had no cause to wear something from the house of Gorlois, and Gaius said she was the only other person besides Morgana who had a right to....


      So, thoughts?

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    • I think this is just another thing that is so complicated that the writers didn't think far enough. They just made it so Morgana and Morgause are related whatsoever so they can united in fight against Uther or Camelot. And to add to it, they made it so twisted that they didn't even recheck about those possibility.

      But for me there are still some things unclear, why on earth Gaius should smuggled Morgause away to the high priestess? Was it because Gaius had to save Morgause, from who then? From Uther, from Gorlois?

      Another thing is, when was Morgause born? After or before Morgana, I don't think that was explained. Everyone just thought that Morgana is the younger one, why?

      For me if Morgause is the younger one, it would make a better speculation. After Morgana was born, Vivienne had another daughter with Gorlois, but then Gorlois was killed because of Uther and Uther couldn't possibly take another ward (Morgana was taken care of cause however she is his daughter). So Uther had Gaius smuggled her away (although he might not know that Gaius send her to the high priestess) and that's why Gaius said she was the only person had a right to wear the bracelet.  Does my speculation make sense? :)

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    • Fimber
      Fimber removed this reply because:
      Was logged out.
      10:53, June 30, 2013
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    • Hi Adelina, nice to see you again :-)

      I would agree with both you and Edrea if Morgana and Morguase hadn't kept calling each other "sister". According to this and given that Uther was Morgana's father, Gaius and Uther must have known that Vivienne had had an affair with another man (before Uther).

      I believe that they had originally planned different things with Morgause/Igraine/Uther/Morgana/Gorlois. When Morgause said that she knew Igraine very well, I thought at first that Morgause was Igraine and Gorlois' child before Gorlois married Vivienne, and maybe Morgause was the reason why Igraine couldn't conceive afterwards.

      However, there would have been a problem: Morgause was approx. nine or ten years older than Arthur (given that Emilia Fox is almost ten years older than Bradley James). Even if she was maybe six years older than Arthur, Igraine would have been a much too young mother.  Granted, in the dark ages, women were having babies as teenagers already but I don't know if the show had intended to take it that far. A woman giving birth to a child at the age of maybe fourteen (or so) would have been questionable for a family show.

      If it hadn't been for the age, it would have made sense if Igraine was Morgause's mother and then later, Uther and Igraine fell in love with each other while Gorlois married Vivienne. This could have been the reason why Uther was led to believe that the child had died because illegitimate children were a big problem back then and perhaps Gorlois didn't want his and/or Igraine's reputation damaged, plus, the king marrying a woman with an illegitimate child would have been a scandal too, not to mention that adultery was punishable by death (depending on whether or not either Igraine or Gorlois were engaged otherwise already).

      This is all just speculation because what we were actually shown on "Merlin" was that Morgause and Morgana were half sisters, related through Vivienne. This made Gorlois being the father of none of them and it made Vivienne a woman who had slept with at least three men: Morgause's father, Gorlois and Uther.

      When Gaius said that they were half-sisters, he must have assumed that Gorlois was Morgana's father and person X was Morgause's father but Vivienne was the mother of both. Then later we learnt that Uther was Morgana's father and M&M kept calling each other "sister", which still proves that person X was Morgause's father but that Vivienne had at least one more man in her life.

      Why Morgause was smuggled out by Gaius remains a miracle. They could have explained it by mentioning that Morgause was supposed to be trained by the Old Religion because she was too valuable to them. At that point of time, Arthur wasn't born yet and Uther was friends with Nimueh, so he had no reason to hate magic or to kill a child because of her powers. Maybe the Old Religion simply didn't want a powerful child being raised by normal humans, so they made Gaius swear to bring her to them and tell everyone that the baby died - which would make Gaius an even more questionable character. Another reason could have been that Gorlois knew that Vivienne had an affair with someone else (person X) and told Gaius to smuggle Morgause out in order to avoid a scandal.


      Now for the epsiode.

      This could have been one of the best episodes to me if it hadn't been for changing the previous storylines, for Merlin and Gaius' sudden amnesia, for Arthur's exaggerated wish to suddenly kill his own father and for Merlin and Arthur believing the word of a sorceress who killed numerous men on her way to Camelot over the word of Arthur's father.

      While Uther and Nimueh proved in a private (!) conversation that Uther had no idea that Igraine will die, "The Sins of the Father" suddenly changed this all and made Igraine claiming that Uther sacrificed her because he knew that the price would be another life. This wouldn't have been a problem if the episode had pointed out that Igraine either wasn't real or that she was simply led to believe that Uther sacrificed her.

      Uther would have no reason to hate magic if he had sacrificed Igraine willingly. The very fact that he lost her and was shocked by it was the reason why he started to hate magic in the first place. And I doubt that he told Igraine "sorry dear, you are dying now because I made a deal and sold your life. Thanks for the son, see you". He loved Igraine and was devastated over her death, so he didn't sacrifice her and he didn't know that her life would be taken, as was evident in "Excalibur". Not to mention that Nimueh chose Igraine, as was evident in "Le Morte d'Arthur".

      Arthur didn't even question the whole situation for a second. There is a stranger, a powerful sorceress who killed several people when invading the throne room, conjuring the ghost of his mother (if so), that coincidentally tells him that his father killed her and was to blame for everything. So Arthur rushes back home in total rage, forgets about the fact that his own "mother" just turned her son against his father and Arthur wants to kill the one he has been knowing all his life and who he loves and who wanted to sacrifice himself for him. ---- All instead of giving it a second thought. Arthur couldn't really love his mother because she was a total stranger to him whereas Uther wasn not a stranger to him, yet he wants to kill him all of a sudden?

      Even if Arthur would have been given proof that Igraine was real and was telling the truth, he couldn't just hate his own father for the sake of someone he has never seen before. A normal person would try to find a reason, to think about it all, to question it and to hear the other side of the story because, heck, it was his own father. There is a difference between being disappointed and angry or being in rage and in the mood for killing a parent.

      Not to mention that Arthur blamed his father for killing people for the sake of the kingdom because he blamed them, but forgot that he himself was about to do the same: killing someone in rage because he (Uther) was supposed to be guilty. And the big difference is that Uther would have never hurt his own family whereas Arthur didn't even blink when trying to kill his own father.

      As if this wasn't ridiculous enough, Merlin suddenly forgets about his own deal with Nimueh and has the nerve to accuse Uther. When Merlin saved Arthur from the Questing Beast's poison, he told Nimueh that he was willing to "pay any price", not knowing that his mother or Gaius would be the ones who will have to die. Yet he blames Uthers that he knew who will have to die? That doesn't make any sense. Merlin almost killed Hunith and Gaius when saving Arthur and making the deal with Nimueh. Why would Merlin believe that Uther knew about Igraine being the price and why did he cast a stone at him for having made the deal with Nimueh when a) Uther had no problem with magic at that point of time and b) Merlin himself did the same thing when saving Arthur?

      And Gaius... why in the world didn't he tell Merlin the truth but simply nodded and made Merlin believe his own fairytale? Gaius was there back then and he was the one who asked Nimueh on Uther's behalf. He was the one who told Nimueh that she chose Igraine. Yet he lets Merlin believe that Uther sacrificed her?

      It's a shame that this episode ignored and changed the previous season and made a mockery of the things we were being shown before. It also made a mockery of Uther's reason for hating magic because, as I said before, if he willingly sacrificed Igraine he wouldn't have had any reason to hate magic at all.

      The fighting scene was great and to me the best swordfight on the entire show, but I have to forget about the reason why they fight to enjoy this moment.

      It was clear that Morgause's intention was to turn Arthur against Uther, and if both Arthur and Merlin had used their brains, they would have known before Arthur tried to slaughter his father. Morgause must have known about what Igraine (or fake Igraine) was about to say, otherwise she wouldnt have summoned her in the first place. How could Morgause know?

      I also disliked Gaius and Merlin talking about being tempted to kill Uther as if it was most normal thing to want someone to die but such a gracious and heroic thing to let him live. Uther's temper was always criticised but when Arthur tries to kill his own father, everything is okay?

      Despite this all, I liked the final scene when Uther thanked Merlin. It showed his sense of honour and appreciation because given that magic was banned, it should have been normal for everyone to fight magic too (in Uther's eyes), so the king actually doesn't have to say thank you for a matter of course. The rare scenes between Uther and Merlin wers some of the best scenes on the show.

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    • Wow, I really missed alot from season 1. Wonder how that happened. I didn't remember watching private scene between Uther, Nimueh, and Gaius. Hmm..the reason to watch them all over again :)

      For Uther, I think the writers tried their best to kill him no matter who or how he was killed from season 1. Uther was made to be someone that should die no matter what good sides he still had. And because of that, everyone had the chance to kill him starting with even his own son to entire Kingdom, no matter how illogical, out of character and strange that will be.

      I can feel how Uther's heart was broken when he realized that Arthur was seriously wanted to kill him. I can imagine how broken he was, he has lost Igraine because of magic to get Arthur. Now Arthur, the only one he truly loves left, tried to kill him because he couldn't protect Igraine.

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    • I feel sorry for Uther...

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    • Edrea wrote:
      Wow, I really missed alot from season 1. Wonder how that happened. I didn't remember watching private scene between Uther, Nimueh, and Gaius. Hmm..the reason to watch them all over again :)


      There was private conversation between Nimueh and Uther in "Excalibur" when they talked about Arthur's birth and when Uther blamed her for Igraine's death. Then there was a private conversation between Gaius and Uther in the same episode in which Gaius confirmed that Uther couldn't know that Igraine had to die for creating a life. If Uther actually knew, why would he tell especially Nimueh that he didn't? Gaius also knew about the whole procedure better than anyone and he too said that Uther was unaware of the consequences (Igraine dying). That's why it was so annyoning that "The Sins of the Father" suddenly changed it and simpy told a different story that didn't make sense in regard to season one.

      StrengthCourageMagic wrote:
      I feel sorry for Uther...


      Fortunately, we as the viewers can afford to feel sorry for someone like Uther, a fictional character. I'm sure it would be different if he was real and if we were involved somehow. From that point of view I understand that Merlin and others actually didn't exactly love Uther. It's no wonder that Merlin strongly disapproved of what Uther did to magic-users.

      However, the show later presented this sort of stuff to us as being the right thing to do instead of questioning it. It's fine to make Merlin acting against Uther but at the same time, the message of the whole thing should be questioned. It should have been questioned that Arthur lost his mind for a while and tried to murder his father. But instead we were being shown that Merlin only saved him for Arthur's sake and that Uther's life actually wasn't worth it. And also that Arthur was actually "right" and only didn't kill Uther because of Merlin's "lie".

      Merlin was being presented as the hero because he prevented Arthur from killing Uther, yet Merlin would have preferred Uther to die and didn't value Uther's life even though Merlin did the same thing with Nimueh that Uther had done before.

      It would have been heroic of Merlin if he had saved Uther for Uther's sake, despite of Merlin's dislike.

      In the final scene, when Merlin admitted that he was tempted to let Arthur kill Uther, Gaius should have given him a lesson in ethics in order to let the viewers know that personal feelings and temporary strong emotions don't necessarily result in the right things to do. Gaius should have enlightened Merlin about the situation with Igraine and he should have reminded him of Merlin's own doings in "Le Morte d'Arthur".

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    • Fimber wrote:
      Edrea wrote:
      Wow, I really missed alot from season 1. Wonder how that happened. I didn't remember watching private scene between Uther, Nimueh, and Gaius. Hmm..the reason to watch them all over again :)
      There was private conversation between Nimueh and Uther in "Excalibur" when they talked about Arthur's birth and when Uther blamed her for Igraine's death. Then there was a private conversation between Gaius and Uther in the same episode in which Gaius confirmed that Uther couldn't know that Igraine had to die for creating a life. If Uther actually knew, why would he tell especially Nimueh that he didn't? Gaius also knew about the whole procedure better than anyone and he too said that Uther was unaware of the consequences (Igraine dying). That's why it was so annyoning that "The Sins of the Father" suddenly changed it and simpy told a different story that didn't make sense in regard to season one.
       

      Thanks for the info and reference

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    • Igraine was not real to me... Dead characters returning appear all in black and white against the colored background. From Freya, Balinor, and even Uther himself. Not to mention Igraine and the children drowned in "The Tears of Uther Pendragon". Even the druid boy in "A Herald of a New Age".

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    • Selecasticon wrote:
      Igraine was not real to me... Dead characters returning appear all in black and white against the colored background. From Freya, Balinor, and even Uther himself. Not to mention Igraine and the children drowned in "The Tears of Uther Pendragon". Even the druid boy in "A Herald of a New Age".


      Agreed. Everything would make much more sense if she wasn't real. Not to mention that ever since "The Death Song of Uther Pendragon", we know that the horn was the tool to visit the afterlife but no one ever mentioned that there was a possibility to get the dead from the afterlife into the world of the living, other than opening the veil or looking back at the spirits in the spirit world which gives them the possibility to escape or drags them into the world of the living.

      The most logical explanation would be that Igraine was a shade (she turned her son against his father, after all) or simply a trick.

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    • Fimber wrote:

      While Uther and Nimueh proved in a private (!) conversation that Uther had no idea that Igraine will die, "The Sins of the Father" suddenly changed this all and made Igraine claiming that Uther sacrificed her because he knew that the price would be another life. This wouldn't have been a problem if the episode had pointed out that Igraine either wasn't real or that she was simply led to believe that Uther sacrificed her.

      Uther would have no reason to hate magic if he had sacrificed Igraine willingly. The very fact that he lost her and was shocked by it was the reason why he started to hate magic in the first place. And I doubt that he told Igraine "sorry dear, you are dying now because I made a deal and sold your life. Thanks for the son, see you". He loved Igraine and was devastated over her death, so he didn't sacrifice her and he didn't know that her life would be taken, as was evident in "Excalibur". Not to mention that Nimueh chose Igraine, as was evident in "Le Morte d'Arthur".


      I found it very obvious that Ygraine's spirit wasn't real but a set up by Morgause.

      Mind you, Nimueh didn't even say that Uther knew that a life had to be taken in exchange for creating one. In the conversation with Gaius, Uther mentioned that he knew about a price that had to be paid and Gaius confirmed that he couldn't to know that the price would be Ygraine's life.

      According to this, a price could have been just anything and Uther had no idea that even someone else would have to die or even suffer. It didn't happen often that he was innocent, but in this case he obviously was. He was ready to pay a price, unaware that someone other than him would suffer from it, and this shows that he wasn't a coward and accepted the rule unless others or Ygraine would be affected by it.

      Ygraine couldn't have been real, except perhaps if she was fed with false information. In any other case, the first series of Merlin must have been a hoax or a dream then ;)

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    • ‘‘That's why it was so annyoning that "The Sins of the Father" suddenly changed it and simpy told a different story that didn't make sense in regard to season one.’’

      It wasn’t without precedent.

      Nimueh went from swearing that she had no idea that Ygraine would be the one to die and that she wouldn’t have agreed to help Uther had she known in ‘‘Excalibur’’ to not raising the slightest argument when she was accused of having deliberately chosen Ygraine to sacrifice in ‘‘Le Morte d’Arthur’’. The ‘‘Excalibur’’ angle is the only one that made sense; unless she was a complete idiot, she would have known that if a man loves his wife so much that he is prepared to resort to magical help, at the cost of somebody’s life, to have a son by her rather than divorcing her and remarrying, is not going to be happy with her if said wife ends up dying as a result of her intervention. However, by turning it on her in ‘‘Le Morte d’Arthur’’, they could allow Merlin to sacrifice an unwilling victim to save Arthur while still allowing him to occupy the moral high ground.

      I don’t know if the Ygraine in this episode is supposed to be misinformed or an illusion or if they were rewriting history but it would make no sense for Uther to be willing to sacrifice his wife in order to have a son. If he was willing to get rid of Ygraine in order to have a son, he could have divorced her, remarried and fathered a son by his new wife. He sought magical help because he wanted to stay married to Ygraine and have a son.

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    • Selecasticon wrote: Igraine was not real to me... Dead characters returning appear all in black and white against the colored background. From Freya, Balinor, and even Uther himself. Not to mention Igraine and the children drowned in "The Tears of Uther Pendragon". Even the druid boy in "A Herald of a New Age".

      Agree!!! :3 And this was a priceless episode!

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    • 198.144.116.184 wrote:
      I found it very obvious that Ygraine's spirit wasn't real but a set up by Morgause.

      Mind you, Nimueh didn't even say that Uther knew that a life had to be taken in exchange for creating one. In the conversation with Gaius, Uther mentioned that he knew about a price that had to be paid and Gaius confirmed that he couldn't to know that the price would be Ygraine's life.

      According to this, a price could have been just anything and Uther had no idea that even someone else would have to die or even suffer. It didn't happen often that he was innocent, but in this case he obviously was. He was ready to pay a price, unaware that someone other than him would suffer from it, and this shows that he wasn't a coward and accepted the rule unless others or Ygraine would be affected by it.

      Ygraine couldn't have been real, except perhaps if she was fed with false information. In any other case, the first series of Merlin must have been a hoax or a dream then ;)

      I agree. I believe that in season one they intended to give Uther redemption at some point of time, which changed later with the show progressing. Sometimes an upcoming redemption was obvious (for example, when he went broken after Morgana's betrayal) and then they changed it all again and described him as a psychopath or war mongerer. Most of it depended on who wrote the script for the epsiodes in question.

      We just need to remember what Gaius said in the character introduction of the Season One DVD, when he explained that Uther brought peace to Camelot by banning magic but at the same time left the kingdom and his son vulnerable to evil by this. This remark alone described magic as being evil, with the rare exceptions of Merlin, Balinor and the druids, and it also demonstrated that the peace in Camelot was only possible by banning magic.

      I'd also like to add that I found it quite weird of Uther not to ask any question about Igraine. He knew that Arthur and Merlin talked to either Igraine or an illusion, so he surely would have wanted to know what she looks like and what exactly she said, how she's doing (in case that he believed she was real). If he thought that she was just an illusion, he could have asked Arthur to describe her in order to find out whether the illusion resembled her at least. And in case she didn't, Uther could have told Arthur what Igraine really looked like. If I knew that someone talked to my dead loved ones, I would want to know everything about them. Uther could at least have shown any sign of curiosity or interest. But then, the show often failed in showing some depth when it came to interesting plots and situations.

      ReganX wrote:

      I don’t know if the Ygraine in this episode is supposed to be misinformed or an illusion or if they were rewriting history but it would make no sense for Uther to be willing to sacrifice his wife in order to have a son. If he was willing to get rid of Ygraine in order to have a son, he could have divorced her, remarried and fathered a son by his new wife. He sought magical help because he wanted to stay married to Ygraine and have a son.

      True. He could also have conceived a child with another woman and pretended to the public that it was Igraine's. There would have been numerous possibilities to get an heir without using magic. Obviously, the showrunners' intention was to demonstrate how important it was to him to have a child with his wife because he loved her.

      Whatever reason they had to suddenly change the story of Igraine and Uther in season two, they didn't do a good job on it. It's not only unbelievable and illogical but it also makes a mockery of Uther's reason to hate magic, let alone of season one at all.

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    • Quick question: Can anybody remember if there was ever a specific reference to Morgause having to be smuggled out of Camelot as a baby because her life was in danger? Uther was under the impression that she had died but I can't remember if it was ever said that he had ordered baby Morgause to be killed.

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    • It has never been mentioned just anywhere that Uther had ordered baby Morgause to be killed, except for fans who had drawn the conclusion. They hadn't considered the fact that Morgause was born long before the Great Purge - which, by the way, has also never been mentioned but is very likely since Emilia Fox is ten years older than Katie McGrath.

      Here is the transcript of the episode:

      http://merlin.wikia.com/wiki/Transcript:The_Sins_of_the_Father


      GAIUS And it bore the mark of one of the Great Houses, the Great House of Gorlois. There is only one person, other than Morgana, who would have cause to wear such a bracelet. That is, a half sister.

      UTHER I was led to believe that the child had died.

      GAIUS The child lived, My Lord. She was smuggled out of Camelot shortly after her birth.

      UTHER How do you know this?

      GAIUS It was I who entrusted the child to the High Priestesses of the Old Religion.

      UTHER You should've told me, Gaius.

      GAIUS I had sworn a solemn oath, My Lord. I'm only breaking it now because I fear what Morgause might do.

      UTHER Does Morgana know?

      GAIUS I don't believe so.

      UTHER Morgana must never find out she has a half sister. I will not have her loyalties divided.

      GAIUS Of course. The High Priestesses will have trained Morgause from birth. Her magic will be powerful.

      UTHER Then we must hope the search party finds Arthur before he reaches her.


      (Sorry for having been so absent recently). Next month will be a bit relaxter for me, I hope)

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    • Wow, I love this episode, and part of the reason why is, as this thread has proven, there are great ethical dilemnas to this episode: Yes, Arthur shouldn't have automatically believed Morgause, but he was driven by thirst for knowledge of his mother, and she is a highly convincing, and manipulative person

      I don't know whether I consider Uther to be right or not, but it is true that Arthur should not kill him, although it is very true that, like Arthur said, Uther was a hypocrite, as he has sometimes used magic for himself, while decrying other people for doing so....


      Also, interesting link between Morgana and Morgause :)


      To be honest, I like it that Arthur and Uther were both grateful to Merlin at the end, but obviously, it's sad that he further accidently convinced them against magic, and that Uther still threatened him- sorry, I really don't like Uther

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    • Regarding Uther, I think he knew SOMEONE had to die in order to create life, only he didn't knew who was the person who would die. 

      What I hate about this episode is that they lie to Arthur. I mean, I have not problem with Merlin trying to convince Arthur about not killing Uther, but I think that Merlin lying to Arthur is wrong. I think Arthur has the right to know the true about his own birth.

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    • Hi everyone, this is my first post on this website. I would like to say thank you for the entertaining discussion in this thread. It's great to find a website where the discussion of Merlin is still alive. Although I am still disappointed with Series 5, Merlin retains a special place in my heart and I am glad to have found like minded people around who are still enthusiastic about the show.

      Regarding this episode in particular. "The Sins of the Father" is one of my favourite stories of all the  series, although I respect the criticisms made by others here.  

      My impression at the end of the episode when I first saw it was that Uther's conspiring with Nimueh to use magic to conceive Arthur was an unfinished plot point. I had hoped eventually in Series 5 that Arthur would find out the truth that Uther's persecution of sorcerers was founded on his guilt of being responsible for his wife's death.  My interpretation of the situation is that Uther knew from the beginning the risks involved of using magic. Nimueh essentially makes her case in Series 1 when she recalls to Uther that she had informed him at the time that a life had to be taken for one to be created. Uther made himself believe that Nimueh was responsible and that all sorcerer's are inherently evil because the truth that he was responsible for Igraine's death was too painful to bear. Uther created a lie because he didn't want to believe in the truth. Nevertheless, the background to Series 1 is unclear,and this, along with countless other examples from all five series, is symptomatic of the frustrating lack of exposition in the show's story and setting. I thought that Arthur's discovery of the true circumstances of his birth would have been an excellent way for the writers to change the character's perception towards magic. Arthur's attitude towards magic was conditioned by his father. Arthur interpreted every hostile action of a sorcerer within the paradigm of this belief.  The revelation that his late father was misguided in his attitude towards magic would have resulted in Arthur challenging the basis of what he was brought up to believe. Merlin's magic reveal to a dyeing Arthur in the Diamond of the Day felt almost incidental. My only misgiving about this episode was that the writers did not decide to write a natural sequel. 

      This episode is very entertaining because it gives us a tantalising glimpse into the background of the story. The plot was intriguing and it was an effective way of introducing Morgause as the main villain of Series 2. The emotions run high and they are beautifully conveyed by the talented cast. The producers made a great decision to cast these relatively unknown actors (with the exception of Richard Wilson and Anthony Head, of course). They made Merlin the magical viewing experience that it was.  

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    • 213.120.234.122 wrote:
      Hi everyone, this is my first post on this website. I would like to say thank you for the entertaining discussion in this thread. It's great to find a website where the discussion of Merlin is still alive. Although I am still disappointed with Series 5, Merlin retains a special place in my heart and I am glad to have found like minded people around who are still enthusiastic about the show.

      Regarding this episode in particular. "The Sins of the Father" is one of my favourite stories of all the  series, although I respect the criticisms made by others here.  

      My impression at the end of the episode when I first saw it was that Uther's conspiring with Nimueh to use magic to conceive Arthur was an unfinished plot point. I had hoped eventually in Series 5 that Arthur would find out the truth that Uther's persecution of sorcerers was founded on his guilt of being responsible for his wife's death.  My interpretation of the situation is that Uther knew from the beginning the risks involved of using magic. Nimueh essentially makes her case in Series 1 when she recalls to Uther that she had informed him at the time that a life had to be taken for one to be created. Uther made himself believe that Nimueh was responsible and that all sorcerer's are inherently evil because the truth that he was responsible for Igraine's death was too painful to bear. Uther created a lie because he didn't want to believe in the truth. Nevertheless, the background to Series 1 is unclear,and this, along with countless other examples from all five series, is symptomatic of the frustrating lack of exposition in the show's story and setting. I thought that Arthur's discovery of the true circumstances of his birth would have been an excellent way for the writers to change the character's perception towards magic. Arthur's attitude towards magic was conditioned by his father. Arthur interpreted every hostile action of a sorcerer within the paradigm of this belief.  The revelation that his late father was misguided in his attitude towards magic would have resulted in Arthur challenging the basis of what he was brought up to believe. Merlin's magic reveal to a dyeing Arthur in the Diamond of the Day felt almost incidental. My only misgiving about this episode was that the writers did not decide to write a natural sequel. 

      This episode is very entertaining because it gives us a tantalising glimpse into the background of the story. The plot was intriguing and it was an effective way of introducing Morgause as the main villain of Series 2. The emotions run high and they are beautifully conveyed by the talented cast. The producers made a great decision to cast these relatively unknown actors (with the exception of Richard Wilson and Anthony Head, of course). They made Merlin the magical viewing experience that it was.  

      Do you know, I agree with pretty much all of it!

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    • A Lurker in the Woods
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